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by Stephanie Palazzolo, managing editor

Wherever you look, they’re are sitting… waiting… watching. Whether it’s in overly-filtered Instagram pictures or trendy Youtube videos, they’ve infiltrated every facet of society. (And no, they’re not minions.)

I’m talking about juices.

And while I’m not encouraging anyone to go on juice cleanses (those really don’t work, by the way), smoothies and juices are an easy way to get a few servings of fruits and vegetables and some energy before or after a workout. Let’s be honest, I will never become a vegetarian and snacking on kale leaves is just about the least appetizing thing I can imagine, but throw in a couple slices of pineapple or apples and some ice, and even the nastiest of vegetables can become pretty darn good.

Whether you’re looking for a relaxing sip or a revitalizing drink, your smoothie or juice can be customized to your needs:

Looking for a pre-workout pick-me-up? Try a reenergizing smoothie with chopped strawberries, blueberries and raspberries.

Perhaps you’d like something that’ll give your skin a nice glow before school starts — make a smoothie with kale leaves, pineapples and chopped green apples.

Or maybe you want a refreshing drink without all the extra sugar? Whip up a smoothie with milk, strawberries and flaxseed oil, which is known to prevent high cholesterol, diabetes and heart diseases.

Whichever way you look at it, smoothies are healthy, delicious and quick — the perfect combination for any rushed and anxiety-ridden teenager. However, make note that just because they may be liquefied or blended, smoothies and juices still have just as many calories as the individual ingredients, so don’t be surprised if you feel a little bloated after drinking three in a row (do not recommend from personal experience).

Paired with a good exercise regimen and lots of water, sprinkling a couple smoothies into your diet is the perfect way to start integrating healthy habits as you study for SATs and fill out college applications — and, who knows? — it might make the process just a little more bearable.